2018 Autumn update

So I’m not doing much scouting since work occupies all of my time until near end of Dec 2018.

And since I decided to do the Lone Scout route it’s been Spartan on the scouting front. I want to do more and am considering rejoining with the 66th Confluence at renewal time.

 

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2018 National Night Out

“Serving” hot wings tonight!

Grilled 40 lbs of donated chicken wings to get them all smokey and browned up.  Grilled

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about half way done and then tossed them into the slow cooker to finish the job.

Added cayenne pepper and habanero hot sauce.  That is about it.

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This Rover at the event

They did not last long. Considering the size of the crowds we have had the last couple of years at N. 14th Street & St. Louis Avenue it was bigger this year.

#nationalnightout #roverscout #bpsa

Where I Serve

The Rover Scout motto in the BPSA-US is “Service“.

It’s part of the whole concept of errant knighthood, looking to do something useful other than fighting windmills, of course.  BPSA-US Rover Scouts are adult scouts, much as Lord Baden-Powell envisioned when he helped start the scouting movement early in the 20th Century.

The idea of course is to be helpful, as it states in the Scout Law.  Perpetuate a lifestyle of being useful in the scout group and in the community at large.  Encouraging others to do the same.

Scouting is a great structure to let your inner-nerd shine, particularly for the introvert.  So far I’ve had success at being useful in the community.  Thus far:

  • As a licensed ham radio operator, KE0JIT. At present as a Technician license operator.  Ham radio licensees are your best friend during any disaster.  With study I would like to go for the General license in 2019.
  • A secret project. Nope, not saying what it is here. It wouldn’t be a secret if I did.
  • Disaster relief (Hurricane Maria) in Puerto Rico through the La Hormiga Project and La Travesia Iglesia.
  • Civil Air Patrol (CAP) – Emergency Services.  If you get lost, or there is a downed pilot, we’ll help come find you.  I also help keep a squadron at CAP safe.

 

And there is other stuff, mostly less organized or more personal.

And during late 2018 into 2019 because time management may not be as big of an issue, I hope to assist in the scout group specifically.  Chiefly the 1st Lone Scouts is my aim, but we’ll see what happens.  Juggling priorities has been an obstacle to attending a hullabaloo or assisting at a BPSA -US Brownsea scout training.

 

The problem with being an old scout

So, yeah, getting old. As the official summer wraps up I am concluding a couple of things.

One is the importance of keep moving about.  If you stop moving, you don’t want to start up again.  Newton was right, particularly as it applies to aging bodies in motion.

So despite my interest in carrying a larger pack and hiking a long distance it probably isn’t going to happen without a beast of burden.  Or an ATV.  I think I’m limited to about a 25 pound load.

Lastly, heat.  Really do not do well in it anymore, especially if somewhat laborious.  So temperatures above 90′ F are managed unlike when I was in my 20’s.  At 52 you can do things in the heat, just not for a very long time.  I discovered this in my early 40’s pouring cement in the back yard when I couldn’t take long breaks.  It hasn’t improved with age.

So being older and a scout has its challenges.  Go for the shaded trails!

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Me in the cold where it had a different set of challenges than the summer heat.

“co-ed” inclusive scouting

A scouting friend of mine recently used the term “co-ed” outside of a scouting discussion.  The movie Animal House immediately came to mind.  Admittedly, I found his usage a bit dated, but nonetheless correct in its context.  We’re both ‘old’ guys, so I at least got where he was going with it.

There has been a lot of talk about the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) dropping ‘boy’ from the name.  They are going co-ed, much to the chagrin of the Girl Scouts.  Personally speaking, I am mystified why in the first place as a country we didn’t do co-ed.  I suspect there was more than just religious views of the day influencing the separation of the sexes, not sure.  (Read Charles Taylor Gatto’s books for clues about this).  There is a view of why separating boys and girls works ‘better’ for learning.  I’m not sure I am on board with that for a host of reasons.  At any rate, it is good that BSA will be more inclusive going forward.  As fellow scouters I wish them well.  However, the USA Today story accurately points out that there were co-ed scouting groups even prior to BPSA-US.  They too are fellow scouters.

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Serving others and getting out and see stuff.  It’s what being a Rover Scout is all about. (Trail location – near Berea College, Berea, KY).

Originally I was attracted to BPSA-US because my daughters could participate with me  (but their participation didn’t stick).  However, BPSA-US follows the ‘traditional’ scouting model, which means that as a kid-at-heart I get to be a Rover Scout as Lord Baden-Powell intended all along.  I continue to be a Scout.  The “game of scouting” is a fun one.  I mean, in the BSA to be an adult scout you have to be an administrator (perhaps it will change?), sometimes missing out on the trail fun.  Learning by doing (and serving) is great for me somewhat due to my Aspergers.  The same Pathfinder skills expected of the children are expected of me.  Not all of those skills are so easy to learn I might add.  Try starting a fire with iron and flint and see what I mean.  (I found fellow Rovers were quite patient with me learning knots and camp craft at my Brownsea).  I mean, who wants to just be an adult administrator when camping, woodcraft, and hiking are involved?

You can’t be good at everything as as an adult.  But Rovering in scouting provides me a fun structure, be part of something bigger with like minded scouters (regardless of the hang-ups about sex, orientation, religion, etc).  I like that.  And I like that USA Today saw the value in reporting that too.

tropical service

It was slow.

It was hot.

Occasionally disorganized.

Homes were rebuilt.

New building skills were acquired (I learned some masonry and rebar fabrication).

A modest hike occurred.

Insect bites were suffered (and continue to be).

Having mechanical and carpentry skills is good!  The ability to serve the people of Puerto Rico was a blessing and honor.

Vaya con Dios

 

#hurricanemaria #puertorico

 

 

Team Puerto Rico

Word has it prior to departure that our work team will assist “La Hormiga” as they work on demolition in a suburb of San Juan, PR.  The homes do not qualify for FEMA funds because the occupants didn’t legally own the property, so private groups are assisting with the rebuild. The state government is assisting the squatters with acquiring legal right to the land.  I do wish them well and not the speed with which matters typically happen on ‘island time’.

The days will be long in the sun. I am looking forward to cool nights and coqui frogs chirping all night.

#hurricanemaria